Answer:

There are several vitamin D oral sprays marketed. They can be as effective as a pill or liquid drop and there is preliminary evidence suggesting they can be more effective than a pill (suggesting direct absorption in the mouth - which could help people with malabsorption conditions), but this is not well-established. However, because they tend to be a bit expensive, they are not necessarily cost effective. Get the details in the Vitamin D Supplements Review >>

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1 Comments

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Henry8029
November 1, 2015

Vitamin D sprayed inside cheeks 2X more response than taken orally – Oct 2015
Published late 2015 - after the Consumerlab report was written
Excellent two way cross over study

Details at: http://vitamindwiki.com/tiki-index.php?page_id=7056

Also - sprays get vitamin D into the blood stream 4X to 8X faster than if vitamin D is taken orally.

ConsumerLab.com
November 9, 2015

Hi Henry - Regarding the two studies you mention, we have written about the first and pointed out a potential weakness with that study. The second study, about vitamin D getting into the blood stream faster if taken orally, was not a study in humans, but a lab experiment using oral tissue from deceased pigs. Better research is needed.

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