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Question:
After developing kidney stones, I was told to avoid tea -- but recently I've heard that green tea might actually be helpful for kidney stones. Is that true?

Answer:
As discussed in the Green Tea Review, both black and green tea contain oxalate, high levels of which can contribute to the development of kidney stones in some people. However, for a number of reasons, this is not much of a concern with green tea (which may even help), and there are even ways to minimize the kidney-stone risk when drinking black tea. Get the details in the "Concerns and Cautions" section of the Green Tea Review >>

Be aware that too much calcium or vitamin C from supplements may increase the risk of kidney stones.

For information about other supplements that may be helpful or harmful regarding kidney stones, see the Encyclopedia article about Kidney Stones.

Also see these related CL Answers:



Is it better to get vitamins from foods or supplements, and are natural vitamins better than synthetic vitamins? >>

I was surprised when my doctor told me to stop taking supplements because my kidney function was low. But after stopping the supplements, my kidney function returned to normal. Can taking a lot of supplements really damage the kidneys? >>

I recently purchased some matcha green tea powder claiming to contain up to "137 times the EGCG" that is in brewed green tea. However, the label does not state an actual amount of EGCG and the company would not provide me with any analysis. Is the label true? >>

Can taking certain forms of potassium, such as potassium citrate, reduce my chances of getting kidney stones? I've read a study that says it can, but it's unclear how much I should take. >>

Is it possible to take too much vitamin C? >>

Is it safer to get calcium from foods than from supplements? How about from calcium-fortified orange juice and non-dairy milks? >>



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Libby11116   July 30, 2016
One of the best ways to prevent kidney stones is to drink water frequently - enough to keep the daytime urine very light yellow. I try to drink 48 to 60 oz of fluid per day and have not formed kidney stones in over 40 years (between ages 19-30 I had several bouts with kidney stones). I drink tea, eat spinach, and take calcium supplements without any problem. If you are not exercising heavily and sweating out electrolytes original Gatorade can be harmful (I don't know about all the new formulations now on the market - read the label for electrolyte content). It's high electrolyte content was most likely the cause of a bad case of water retention that I developed on a trip down the Grand Canyon - I was hot and sweaty from heat - not from exercise. Both my doctor and my brother who was a cross-country bicyclist told me that due to its high electrolyte contents, Gatorade should never be used as a go-to beverage.

Dennis 8209   December 22, 2015
A friend of mine contracted kideny stones as a result of consuming gator aid exclusive of other healthy products such as water. This causes me to think and wonder if we consume any liquid in excess (other than water ) are we not inviting health risks? I am supposing, perhaps, we should partake in all things in moderation?

This CL Answer initially posted on 12/19/2015. Last updated 8/2/2017.

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