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Question:
I recently purchased some matcha green tea powder claiming to contain up to "137 times the EGCG" that is in brewed green tea. However, the label does not state an actual amount of EGCG and the company would not provide me with any analysis. Is the label true?

Answer:
Although this “137 times” claim appears on a number of products, it appears to be false and based on misleading and borrowed science. This, and a concern with lead contamination in matcha, is explained in the “Brewed Green Tea vs. Matcha” section of the Green Tea Product Review >>


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ellen254   October 26, 2014
I would like an analysis of the fluoride/fluorine content of green tea and green tea supplements from the point of view of its effect on thyroid function.

Mykola258   November 2, 2014
Would love to see an evaluation of HerbaSway green tea extract.

James-Henry253   October 26, 2014
About your finding that matcha includes lead: Where was the matcha grown? Was it Japanese, or was it from China? I expect that would make a difference.

ConsumerLab.com   October 27, 2014
Hi James-Henry - You are correct that the region (and other issues) will affect lead levels. Among the green tea leaf products tested, the lowest amount was from a product which specifically identified it as coming from Japan. It is likely that most other products were from tea leaf from China.

Please note that the products tested to-date by ConsumerLab.com were for tea leaf sold as loose tea, tea bags, or K-cups, for brewable teas and did not include a matcha product. As mentioned in our Review, the comparison of matcha to brewable green tea mentioned in the original question, above, is faulty because it greatly understates the amount of EGCG in brewable green tea.

This CL Answer initially posted on 10/26/2014. Last updated 8/8/2017.

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