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Question:
Should I worry about getting too much fluoride from drinking tea?

Answer:
Green tea, as well as black tea, contains a small amount of fluoride. Excess fluoride can cause teeth and bones to become brittle (a condition called "fluorosis"). This is unlikely to occur with consumption of just a few cups of tea daily, but has occurred in people habitually consuming very large amounts of tea. For more details, see the see the "Concerns and Cautions" section of the Green Tea Review (Including Brewable, Bottled, Matcha, and Supplements) >>

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Richard11205   August 28, 2016
According to the American Dental Association, fluorosis occurs only if too much fluoride is consumed during the first 8 years of childhood. Even nursing mothers consuming lots of fluoride pass almost none of it in their breast milk. Anyone older than 8 should have no concerns about consuming fluoride in tea or other beverages.

ConsumerLab.com   August 29, 2016
Richard, there are several documented cases of fluorosis in women from excess tea consumption, as noted in our report. This issue is not limited to children, as you seem to suggest.

Richard11208   August 29, 2016
Were those cases tooth fluorosis or bone fluorosis? If they were tooth fluorosis, then someone needs to correct the ADA website.

Either way, bone fluorosis does exist and can develop in adults, so my comment that anyone older than 8 should have no concerns is incorrect, and I apologize.


ConsumerLab.com   August 29, 2016
Both tooth and bone were affected in the women, as discussed in our report.

This CL Answer initially posted on 8/25/2016. Last updated 7/26/2017.

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