Recalls and Warnings

U.S. Attorney's Office Bars Chiropractor from Selling Fake Coronavirus Cures

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(Date Posted: 4/21/2020)

On April 17, 2020, the United States Attorney's Office for the Northern District of Texas announced that it has obtained a temporary restraining order preventing a chiropractor from promoting fake treatments for coronavirus (COVID-19). Dr. Ray L. Nannis, a who is a licensed chiropractor in the Dallas-Fort Worth area but does not have a medical degree or medical license, was advertising homeopathic products from his company Optimum Wellness Solutions with false claims that they could treat coronavirus.

For example, products were promoted with statements such as "C-19 vaccine" and "treatment, reducing severity and duration of symptoms, should you test positive." The chiropractor also posted videos on Optimum Wellness's Facebook account, where he said his products offer "up to 90 percent protection" against coronavirus and that homeopathy "will help us avoid being sick or if you do get sick, it's going to make it very, very, very minimal." Nannis sold his homeopathy sublingual products for $95 per dose.

The U.S. Attorney's Office considers Dr. Nannis's products to be "worthless and potentially dangerous treatments" and emphasized that the FDA "has not identified any immunizations, treatments, or cures for the novel coronavirus to date."

See ConsumerLab's answer to the question: What are natural remedies for coronavirus (COVID-19)? Do supplements like zinc, vitamin C, or herbals work?

See Related Warnings:

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FTC Warns Companies Selling Immune "Boosters," Vitamin C and More for Coronavirus Claims

Herbs of Kedem Warned for Making Coronavirus Claims

FDA Warns Seller of Products Promoted to Treat Coronavirus in Pets and Humans

FDA Warns Sellers of CBD, Colloidal Silver & Natural Remedies Promoted to Treat Coronavirus

For more information, use the link below.

U.S. Attorney's Office Files Enforcement Action Against Chiropractor Promoting Fake COVID-19 Treatment



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