Posted May 10, 2012

Maker of Concentration, Pain, Immune and Cholesterol Supplement and More Warned For Drug Claims

On April 24, 2013, the FDA issued a warning letter to EuroPharma Co., Inc., following a review of the company’s website which found statements made about Calm Kids, CholestCaps, CuraMed 375 mg, CuraMed 750 mg, Curamin, Mental Advantage, Tri-Iodine, and Viragen to be drug claims. On April 24, 2013, the FDA issued a warning letter to EuroPharma Co., Inc., following a review of the company’s website which found statements made about Calm Kids, CholestCaps, CuraMed 375 mg, CuraMed 750 mg, Curamin, Mental Advantage, Tri-Iodine, and Viragen to be drug claims. These products were also found to be misbranded.

Calm Kids contains vitamin B6, DHA oil, DMAE bitartrate, Phosphatidylserine, Rhodiola rosea root extract, grape seed extract, L-tyrosine, N-acetyl-L-cysteine and L-taurine. It was promoted for mental focus and emotional wellbeing in children on the website, which linked to an article titled, “Help Children with Attention Deficit-Hyperactivity Disorder (ADD OR ADHD).”

(See ConsumerLab.com’s Reviews of B Vitamin Supplements and Fish Oil and Omega-3 Fatty Acid Supplements for tests of related products.)

CholestCaps contains gooseberry fruit extract and was promoted for the treatment of cholesterol on the website, which linked to an article which stated, “Indian Gooseberry… manages cholesterol properly minus the side effect of drugs.”

(See ConsumerLab.com’s Review of Cholesterol-Lowering Supplements for tests of related products.)

CuraMed 375 mg and CuraMed 750 mg contain curcumin. They were promoted for pain and inflammation on the website, which linked to an article titled, “PAIN and INFLAMMATION The Healing Power of Curcumin.”

Curamin contains DLPA (DL-phenylalanine), boswellia, gum resin extract, curcumin, and nattokinase. It was promoted for pain relief with statements such as, ”developed using four high-powered ingredients, each of which has pain-relieving properties.”

(See ConsumerLab.com’s Review of Turmeric and Curcumin Supplements for tests of related products.)

Mental Advantage contains vitamin D3, sage oil and rosemary oil. It was promoted for mental focus and concentration on the website, which linked to an article that described sage and rosemary oil as “… similar to how the prescription drug [acetylcholinesterase inhibitors used to treat Alzheimer’s disease] works, but without the serious adverse effects.”

(See ConsumerLab.com’s Review of Vitamin D Supplements and Memory Enhancement Supplements for test of related products.)

Tri-Iodine contains potassium iodide, sodium iodide, and molecular iodine. It was promoted for thyroid disease on the website, which linked to an article that made statements such as “The following conditions are routinely treated with iodine [. . .] with effective results [. . .] breast disease, diabetes [. . .] ovarian cysts, migraine headaches, fibrocystic breasts, thyroid disorders and vaginal infections.”

(See ConsumerLab.com’s Review of Potassium Iodide Supplements for tests of related products.)

Viragen contains Cinnamomum camphora, Myrtus communis, Thymus satureioides, and Laurus nobilis. It was promoted for the treatment of cold and flu on the website, which linked to an article that made statements such as “Thymus saturieoides is [. . .] a strong antibacterial, fighting a variety of strains, including Staphylococcus aureus (the cause of staph infections) and Escherichia coli."

(See ConsumerLab.com’s Review of Echinacea Supplements for tests of related products.)

To read the FDA’s warning letter, use the link below. These products were also found to be misbranded. Calm Kids contains vitamin B6, DHA oil, DMAE bitartrate, Phosphatidylserine, Rhodiola rosea root extract, grape seed extract, L-tyrosine, N-acetyl-L-cysteine and L-taurine. It was promoted for mental focus and emotional wellbeing in children on the website, which linked to an article titled, “Help Children with Attention Deficit-Hyperactivity Disorder (ADD OR ADHD).” (See ConsumerLab.com’s Reviews of B Vitamin Supplements and Fish Oil and Omega-3 Fatty Acid Supplements for tests of related products.) CholestCaps contains gooseberry fruit extract and was promoted for the treatment of cholesterol on the website, which linked to an article which stated, “Indian Gooseberry… manages cholesterol properly minus the side effect of drugs.” (See ConsumerLab.com’s Review of Cholesterol-Lowering Supplements for tests of related products.) CuraMed 375 mg and CuraMed 750 mg contain curcumin. They were promoted for pain and inflammation on the website, which linked to an article titled, “PAIN and INFLAMMATION The Healing Power of Curcumin.” Curamin contains DLPA (DL-phenylalanine), boswellia, gum resin extract, curcumin, and nattokinase. It was promoted for pain relief with statements such as,” developed using four high-powered ingredients, each of which has pain-relieving properties.” (See ConsumerLab.com’s Review of Turmeric and Curcumin Supplements for tests of related products.) Mental Advantage contains vitamin D3, sage oil and rosemary oil. It was promoted for mental focus and concentration on the website, which linked to an article that described sage and rosemary oil as “… similar to how the prescription drug [acetylcholinesterase inhibitors used to treat Alzheimer’s disease] works, but without the serious adverse effects.” (See ConsumerLab.com’s Review of Vitamin D Supplements and Memory Enhancement Supplements for test of related products.) Tri-Iodine contains potassium iodide, sodium iodide, and molecular iodine. It was promoted for thyroid disease on the website, which linked to an article that made statements such as “The following conditions are routinely treated with iodine [. . .] with effective results [. . .] breast disease, diabetes [. . .] ovarian cysts, migraine headaches, fibrocystic breasts, thyroid disorders and vaginal infections.” (See ConsumerLab.com’s Review of Potassium Iodide Supplements for tests of related products.) Viragen contains Cinnamomum camphora, Myrtus communis, Thymus satureioides and Laurus nobilis. It was promoted for the treatment of cold and flu on the website, which linked to an article that made statements such as “Thymus saturieoides is [. . .] a strong antibacterial, fighting a variety of strains, including Staphylococcus aureus (the cause of staph infections) and Escherichia coli [. . .].” (See ConsumerLab.com’s Review of Echinacea Supplements for tests of related products.) To read the FDA’s warning letter, use the link below.