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Product Review

Tuna, Salmon, Sardines & Herring Review (Canned and Packaged)

Find the Best Tuna, Salmon, Sardines & Herring. Avoid Mercury and Arsenic and Maximize EPA & DHA Omega-3s!

Canned tuna, salmon and sardines reviewed by ConsumerLab.com

CL Answer

How good are sardines? Are they healthy and safe? What did CL's tests find?

Find out amounts of omega-3s (DHA and EPA), protein, and vitamin D in sardines, as well as contaminants mercury and arsenic based on ConsumerLab's tests.

Are Sardines Safe and Healthy To Eat? -- Can of Sardines

Clinical Update

2/25/2022

Mercury Levels in Tuna

A CL member asked Wild Planet to comment on the mercury levels ConsumerLab found in its tuna products. See the response in the Update to our Tuna, Salmon & Sardines Review. Also see our Top Picks among canned tuna, salmon, and sardines.

CL Answer

Can I use a home test for mercury to check for mercury in fish, like canned tuna, fresh fish, and sushi?

Find out if home mercury test kits can be used to test fish, such as canned tuna, fresh fish or sushi for mercury contamination. Plus, find out how much mercury ConsumerLab found in popular canned tuna and canned salmon. ConsumerLab.com's answer explains.

salmon filet with test tubes and beakers for mercury testing

News Release

7/10/2020

Best and Worst Tuna, Salmon and Sardines? ConsumerLab Tests Reveal Amounts of Omega-3s and Toxic Heavy Metals in Canned and Packaged Fish

White Plains, New York, July 10, 2020 — Canned and packaged tuna, salmon and sardines can be an excellent source of omega-3 fatty acids, but some may also be contaminated with toxic heavy metals such as mercury and arsenic.

News Release

9/12/2018

Little Omega-3 and High Mercury Found In Some Canned Tuna -- Better Choices Selected for Tuna and Salmon

White Plains, New York, September 12, 2018 — Some popular canned tuna contain much lower amounts of omega-3 fatty acids than recommended for cardiovascular benefits while being high in mercury and/or arsenic, according to tests by ConsumerLab.com.