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Product Review

Iron Supplements Review (Iron Pills, Liquids and Chews)

See Which Iron Supplements Are CL's Top Picks for Different Needs

News Release

1/04/2018

ConsumerLab.com Reveals Its Top Picks for Best Iron Supplements

White Plains, New York, January 4, 2018 — Iron supplements not only treat iron deficiency, but can help reduce unexplained fatigue in women and symptoms of some forms of restless legs syndrome. But choosing an iron supplement and knowing how to use it can be difficult. Not all products are properly made and there are many strengths and forms available, including ferrous fumarate, gluconate, glycinate and bisglycinate, succinylate, and sulfate.

News Release

3/30/2011

ConsumerLab.com finds 100-fold variation in cost of iron supplements

WHITE PLAINS, NEW YORK — MARCH 28, 2011 — ConsumerLab.com announced today that the cost to get an equivalent dose of iron from supplements varies by more than 100-fold. A 25 mg dose of iron can cost as little as two cents or over two dollars, depending on the product. In addition to the cost analysis, ConsumerLab.com conducted laboratory tests and label reviews on iron supplements. In contrast to ConsumerLab.com's 2008 report on iron supplements -- in which 20% of selected supplements failed to meet quality standards -- all products in the current review contained their listed amounts of iron and did not exceed contamination limits for lead. However, one product violated FDA labeling requirements by displaying a heart symbol on its label, representing an unapproved health claim.

News Release

2/10/2022

Best Iron Supplements for Different Needs? ConsumerLab Selects Its Top Picks

White Plains, New York, February 10, 2022 — With so many different forms and doses of iron available from supplements, it can be difficult for consumers to know which best suits their needs. To help, ConsumerLab recently reviewed the clinical evidence, and selected, purchased, and tested popular iron supplements on the market, including tablets, capsules, liquids and chews. Each product was tested to see if it contained its claimed amount of iron, as well as for contamination with lead and other toxic heavy metals, and the ability of pills to properly break apart.