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Posted August 8, 2022

Woman Pleads Guilty for Selling and Promoting Products to Treat COVID-19

On July 27, 2022, Diana Daffin, owner of Savvy Holistic Health pleaded guilty to selling products with claims they could treat COVID-19 and promised “Immunity for Humans.” The products were sold under the HAMPL brand name.

According to the U.S. Department of Justice news release about the case, Daffin told the FDA she had removed the products from her website after receiving a warning from the agency, but continued to sell the products, including to an undercover officer. The news release states that in an email to the undercover officer, Daffin stated “This stuff does work for covid, but fda shut it down.”

The FDA issued warning letters to Daffin in 2020 for selling products marketed for pets, as well as for people, with claims they could prevent or treat COVID-19, as well as other conditions. These products included Doctor’s Best for Your Pets, Savvy Holistic Health Pet Essences, Holistic Animal Remedies (HAMPL)/HAMPL Pet Formulas, Calm My Pet, and Glacier Peak Holistics.

For more information and tests of related products, see ConsumerLab’s answer to Do any supplements help with COVID-19? Do supplements like vitamin D, zinc, vitamin C, or herbals work?

Also see our Joint Health Supplements for Pets Review (Glucosamine, Chondroitin, MSM & Boswelia.

For more information, use the link below.

North Carolina Woman Pleads Guilty to Selling Unapproved Covid-19 Remedies

See related recalls and warnings:

Ten Multi-Level Marketing Companies Warned for Coronavirus and Deceptive Earnings Claims

FTC, FDA, and DOJ Take Joint Action Against Herbal Tea Companies for COVID Claims

Federal Court Bars Fusion Health From Promoting Vitamin

Seller of CBD Tinctures, Creams & Pet Products Promoted for Pain, Cancer & More Warned by FDA

Seller of Vitamin C, Vitamin D, Ashwagandha, and More Warned for COVID-19 Claims