Initially Posted: 10/17/2020
Apple Cider Vinegar Supplements Reviewed by ConsumerLab.com

Apple cider vinegars and ACV supplements compared in this review

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365 [Whole Foods] Organic Raw Apple Cider Vinegar

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American Health Apple Cider Vinegar Tablets

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Bragg Apple Cider Vinegar With The "Mother"

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Goli Nutrition Apple Cider Vinegar Gummies

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Lucy's Organic Apple Cider Vinegar

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Market Pantry [Target] Apple Cider Vinegar

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Nature's Bounty Apple Cider Vinegar 480 mg

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NOW Apple Cider Vinegar 450 mg

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Puritan's Pride Apple Cider Vinegar 480 mg

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Spring Valley [Walmart] Apple Cider Vinegar

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Vermont Village Turmeric & Honey Apple Cider Vinegar

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Vitacost Organic Apple Cider Vinegar

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Wellpath Pure Organic Apple Cider Vinegar Gummies

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Summary

  • Does apple cider vinegar work? Apple cider vinegar (as a liquid) may reduce or slow the increase in blood sugar after eating (although it may not help people with diabetes) and may modestly aid with weight loss. The effects of apple cider vinegar may be due to its acetic acid content, which tends to be about 5% in vinegars (equaling about 800 to 900 mg of acetic acid per tablespoon). There is no good clinical research supporting the use of pills containing apple cider vinegar in powder form — these generally provide a much smaller amount of acetic acid per serving but can be dangerous if the acetic acid is too highly concentrated. (See What It Is and What It Does).
  • What did CL's tests show? One bottled apple cider vinegar could not be approved because we were not able to authenticate its contents as true apple cider vinegar, and two supplements were deemed Not Approved because they did not have the acidity claimed on their labels. Products were found to vary in their acidity and acetic acid content (which ranged from as little as 14 mg to 816 mg per serving). The cost to get 750 mg of acetic acid from products ranged from just 6 cents to more than $20. (See What CL Found and use the Results table to compare the amounts of acetic acid in products).
  • Best apple cider vinegar products: Two bottled apple cider vinegars (one with "Mother" and one without) were chosen as Top Picks, providing real apple cider vinegar with appropriate acetic acid content at a good value and without heavy metal contamination. CL also selected a Top Pick among tablets, capsules and gummies (although there is no good evidence that these provide a health benefit).
  • How much to take? Typically one teaspoon to one tablespoon of apple cider vinegar is diluted in 1.5 to 8 ounces of warm water and taken before meals. (See ConsumerTips: Dosage)
  • Other Concerns: Chronic use of apple cider vinegar may erode tooth enamel, so don't let it linger in the mouth, and rinse afterward. As it may affect blood sugar levels, it should be used with caution in people with diabetes. It should also be used with caution in people with gastroparesis (delayed stomach emptying), as it may further slow the movement of food in the stomach. For more details, see Concerns and Cautions.
You must be a ConsumerLab.com member to get the full test results along with ConsumerLab.com's Top Picks and Consumer Tips on how to choose and use apple cider vinegar. You'll get results for 13 apple cider vinegar liquids and supplements: 10 selected by ConsumerLab.com and 3 others that passed the same testing in our voluntary Quality Certification Program.  

You'll get all of the following information about apple cider vinegar as liquids and pills in this comprehensive review:

  • Which apple cider vinegars and ACV supplements passed or failed testing
  • Which apple cider vinegars offer the best quality and value and are CL's Top Picks
  • What apple cider vinegar can and cannot do for your health, including blood sugar control, weight loss, digestion, and topical use.
  • How bottled vinegars differ from ACV supplements
  • The dose of apple cider vinegar for specific uses
  • What to look for on product labels and how to take apple cider vinegar safely
  • Cautions and potential side effects of apple cider vinegar

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