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Last Updated: 07/24/2021 |

Cranberry juice and supplement brands compared in this review

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Azo Cranberry

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Ellura

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Lakewood Organic Cranberry Juice Concentrate

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Lakewood Organic Pure Cranberry

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Ocean Spray Pure Unsweetened Cranberry

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R.W. Knudsen Family Just Cranberry

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Solaray CranActin

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Swanson Cranberry

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Theralogix Nutritional Science TheraCran One

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Trader Joe's 100% Cranberry Juice

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Trunature Cran-Max

Make sure the cranberry juice or supplement you take passed our tests and is right for you!
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Summary

  • Does cranberry help treat or prevent UTIs?

    Drinking cranberry juice or taking a cranberry supplement may help reduce the risk of recurrent UTIs in women, although the evidence is limited. Drinking the juice is more likely to help than taking a supplement. More limited evidence suggests cranberry may also reduce symptoms of overactive bladderand of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and prostatitis. See What It Does for details.

    There is less evidence of benefit for dried cranberries and cranberry chews, and the benefit of cranberry for UTIs in children remains uncertain.

  • What is in cranberry that helps it work against UTIs?

    Cranberries contain a variety of polyphenolic compounds that include proanthocyanidins (PACs). PACs from cranberry have been shown to limit the ability of E. coli bacteria to adhere to the walls of the bladder and urinary tract. By limiting this adhesion, PACs from cranberry — particularly soluble, A-type PACS — may reduce the risk of urinary tract infections (UTIs). See  What It Is for more information.
  • Best cranberry juice or pills?

    ConsumerLab's tests determined the amounts of soluble, A-type PACs in cranberry products. Amounts per serving ranged nearly 200-fold, from as little as just 0.54 mg to as much as 105.6 mg, and the cost to get 36 mg of PACs ranged from just 35 cents to $21.67. See What CL Found for details.

    Our Top Picks among cranberry juices and supplements each provided the highest amount of PACs among competing brands and did so at much lower cost.
  • What to look for on cranberry labels?

    When looking at the amounts of PACs listed on labels, it is critical that you also look for the method used to determine those amounts, because different methods, such as BL-DMAC (or DMAC/A2) versus OSP-DMAC (or cPAC-DMAC) can yield very different results (see PAC Test Methods for details) and lack of a listed method can make any amount meaningless.

  • Is cranberry safe to use?

    Cranberry beverages or dietary supplements are generally safe for most people, although people with diabetes, those at risk for kidney stones, and those with an aspirin allergy may need to use caution. See Concerns and Cautions for details.
You must be a member to get the full test results along with ConsumerLab.com's recommendations and quality ratings of ginseng supplements. You will get results for 11 cranberry products selected for testing by ConsumerLab, including five cranberry juices (including one cranberry concentrate) and six cranberry supplements.

In this comprehensive review, you'll discover:
  • Which cranberry juices and supplements passed or failed our testing and why
  • CL's Top Picks among juices and supplements for quality and value
  • The amount of proanthocyanidins (PACs) in each cranberry product (specifically, A-type, soluble PACs)
  • What to look for on cranberry juice and cranberry supplement labels, and why choosing a product that lists the amount of PACs and the testing method used to determine this amount is so important
  • Cranberry dosage for urinary tract infections (UTIs) and overactive bladder (OAB)
  • Potential side effects and drug interactions with cranberry

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