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Gluten-Free Supplements & Vitamins

Question:
How can I find supplements that are gluten-free on ConsumerLab.com?

Answer:
ConsumerLab.com does three things to help people with gluten-sensitivity know whether or not products are gluten-free:

First, in the Results table within each of our Product Reviews, we indicate in the last column which products claim to be "gluten-free."

Second, we provide the full list of ingredients for each product we test and all special dietary features, such as gluten-free, vegetarian, vegan, and kosher. You can get this information by clicking on the word "Ingredients" beneath the name of the product in the first column of the Results table of each Review.

Third, ConsumerLab.com now tests for gluten in products claiming to be "gluten-free" for select, popular categories of products. So far, gluten testing has been performed on Multivitamins, Probiotics and Protein Powders and Drinks. The gluten-free claim, as defined by the FDA means that the amount of gluten in a product is less than 20 parts per million. However, since gluten sensitivity is a function of total exposure, ConsumerLab.com applies a more stringent gluten requirement of less than 5 parts per million when serving sizes are greater than 5 grams or 5 ml.

Be aware that for those who do not have celiac disease, non-celiac gluten sensitivity, or wheat allergy, there is no data to support the purported health benefits of a gluten-free diet, according to an analysis in the Journal of Pediatrics. The analysis noted that because gluten-free foods are often higher in saturated fat and sugar than their gluten-containing counterparts, maintaining a gluten-free diet can lead to insulin resistance and obesity, deficiencies in B vitamins, folate and iron, and increased exposure to heavy metals (such as arsenic in rice). The prevalence of the celiac disease in the U.S. is estimated to be less than 1% (although, interestingly, a high proportion of this 1% appears to go undiagnosed). The prevalence of gluten/wheat sensitivity, in which gluten-containing foods can produce symptoms but celiac disease is not present, is estimated to be between 0.5% and 6% (Reilly, J Pediatr 2016). If you are considering a gluten-free diet due to physical symptoms, consult your healthcare provider first, as removing gluten from your diet can make celiac disease more difficult to diagnose.

Learn More About Gluten-Free Supplements and Diets:



I recently read that a gluten-free diet may increase your exposure to arsenic and mercury. Is this true? >>

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COMMENTS

Carol 10973   June 22, 2016
I am not celiac, but have managed to control seasonal and animal allergies by being gluten-free. I don't understand why it should be dangerous - unless you eat processed foods that should be avoided in any case. I eat meat, fish, vegetables and a little fruit and am very healthy.

Janice17269   October 31, 2018
I agree. I am celiac but avoid all processed gluten free products as i always did before I was diagnosed.

Elyn10885   June 22, 2016
Gluten-free foods don't necessarily have more sugar and fat--unless you are referring to gluten-free substitute foods, such as cookies and biscuits and breads. Those indeed are not a wise choice.

cynthia8435   February 14, 2016
Just because a supplement is listed as gluten free it doesn't guarantee that it is as illustrated by a recent study on probiotics. Does consumer labs test for gluten in so called .gluten free products?

ConsumerLab.com   February 19, 2016
Hi Cynthia - Yes, as mentioned above, we have begun testing for gluten in products claiming to be "gluten-free" in select, popular categories.


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This CL Answer initially posted on 3/15/2012. Last updated 6/12/2019.
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