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Vial of flu vaccine in front of a syringe and another vial

Answer:

Influenza vaccines, commonly called "flu shots" help protect against getting severe influenza from the flu viruses that are expected to be most common during the upcoming year's flu season. For the 2021-2022 flu season, all available influenza vaccines are "quadrivalent," meaning they protect against two different influenza A viruses and two different influenza B viruses.

However, quadrivalent flu vaccines differ in how they are made and what they contain, and this can impact their efficacy and appropriateness for different people. They may contain live attenuated virus (FluMist), inactivated virus (Afluria, Fluarix, FluLaval, Fluzone and Fluzone High-Dose, Fluad, and Flucelvax), or recombinant viral protein (Flublok).

Sign in to learn how these differ and which may be most suitable for older people, as well as those with egg allergy, and find out where to get a vaccine and what the cost might be (if, for example, you don't have insurance).

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Debra23746
November 7, 2021

I decided to get my Pfizer booster and my first ever flu vaccine (FluZone High-Dose) on the same day. In retrospect, I wish I had spaced them out. I had no significant reactions to my initial Pfizer vaccines earlier in the year. The combo (or maybe it was just the flu shot) gave me severe chills, a fever, muscle aches, nausea, and fatigue that lasted over a week. I am still feeling the effects almost two weeks later. I wish I would have checked in with my doctor about doing this beforehand, but my husband did the same thing and had little or no side effects. However, he has received a flu shot every year for years.

Debra23745
November 7, 2021

I decided to get my Pfizer booster and my first ever flu vaccine (FluZone High-Dose) on the same day. In retrospect, I wish I had spaced them out. I had no significant reactions to my initial Pfizer vaccines earlier in the year. The combo (or maybe it was just the flu shot) gave me severe chills, a fever, muscle aches, nausea, and fatigue that lasted over a week. I am still feeling the effects almost two weeks later. I wish I would have checked in with my doctor about doing this beforehand, but my husband did the same thing and had little or no side effects. However, he has received a flu shot every year for years.

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