Answer:

Many popular oat milks are not really made from just oats and water, but from oats that have been chemically processed to turn some of their healthful, complex carbohydrates into not-so healthful simple sugars, such as maltose. This makes these oat milks sweet but means that you are essentially adding some sugar to your coffee. This explains the head-scratching labels on oat milks that list several grams of "added sugar" in their Nutrition Facts panels but don't list sugar as an ingredient.

Some brands, such as Oatly, for example, have as much as 7 grams of sugar (about 1.7 teaspoonfuls of sugar) per cup of oat milk, although this is only about half the amount in cow's milk (as lactose) or in lactose-free milk in which the lactose has been converted to glucose. On the other hand, a cup of oat milk typically provides less than half the protein (about 2 to 3 grams) found in cow's milk (about 8 grams). 

[ConsumerLab has tested Oatly oat milk and other plant-based milks -- such as soy milk, almond milk, cashew milk, coconut milk, and pea milk. See what we found, how they compare, and our Top Picks in our Plant-based Milks Review.]

Oat milk also provides a gram or two of soluble fiber, which you won't get from cow's milk, but not nearly as much as you would get from whole oats which also provide insoluble fiber in the form of bran -- a portion of the oat typically not included in oat milks. 

Vegetable oil is often added to oat milk for texture, adding a few grams of fat, but, in contrast to cow's milk, this is mainly unsaturated fat. 

One cup of oat milk typically provides about 25-30% of the Daily Value (DV) of calcium, which is added. This is just like getting calcium from a supplement, so be aware that you don't want to get too much calcium (500 mg or more) at a time, as you can't absorb more than that amount, nor should you get more than 1,000 mg of calcium per day this way as there is an increased risk of stroke with too much calcium from supplements (which is not the case with calcium naturally in cow's milk). 

Significant and generally safe amounts of vitamins are often added to oat milks, such as vitamin A, vitamin B12, and vitamin D. These are disclosed on labels.

The bottom line:
Oat milk in your coffee, or consumed on its own, is a healthy alternative to regular milk. It contains some sugar but less than in cow's milk. It also contains little to none of the saturated fat you'll get from regular milk and it can provide significant amounts of key vitamins. However, it's probably best not to consume more than 2 to 3 cups of oat milk per day to avoid getting too much supplemental calcium.

ConsumerLab has tested Oatly oat milk and other plant-based milks -- such as soy milk, almond milk, cashew milk, coconut milk, and pea milk. See what we found, how they compare, and our Top Picks in our Plant-based Milks Review.

Join today to unlock all member benefits including full access to all CL Answers and over 1,300 reviews.

Join Now

Join now at www.consumerlab.com/join/

12 Comments

Join the conversation

Heather18813
January 5, 2020

I've read oat milk is high in glyphosate, so be sure it is non-GMO.

ConsumerLab.com
January 6, 2020

There is the "potential" for glyphosate to be be in oat milk if it is not made from organic oats (i.e., not treated with pesticides like glyphosate). However, we have not seen any published information about levels in oat milks. What is the basis for your claim that levels of glyphosate are high in oat milk?

Gretchen18822
January 7, 2020

The Environmental Working Group tested oats and granolas for glyphosate and found high levels. https://www.ewg.org/childrenshealth/glyphosateincereal

ConsumerLab.com
January 7, 2020

You can see our discussion of those and other glyphosate tests at https://www.consumerlab.com/answers/how-concerned-should-i-be-about-glyphosate-in-foods-and-supplements/glyphosate-food-supplements/. To our knowledge, oat milks have not been included in these tests.

Steven18849
January 13, 2020

That's something you need to test for us.

ConsumerLab.com
January 14, 2020

You can avoid glyphosate in oat milk by selecting a product made from organic oats, as offered by several brands. This same advice applies to other oat-based products.

John18810
January 5, 2020

I make my own oat milk. No added sugar or calcium or anything else. Maybe a little vanilla or cinnamon on occasion.

Catharine18815
January 6, 2020

I would love to learn how to make oat milk.

Mikhail 19022
January 16, 2020

1 cup of oats and 40oz of water. Blend on high in the blender (some have option "oat/nut milk" and it's a lot of recipes online :)

Tracey18804
January 5, 2020

When you do your study comparing "milks" could you please include info on the nutrient values of making your own at home? I've been making my own nut and oat milk for years because it is made from organic products and contains no additives like all store bought products have. Thank you!

Steven18803
January 5, 2020

I would like to see you test Oat Milks for glyphosate and rice milk for arsenic

Mikhail 18800
January 5, 2020

What about homemade oat milk? :(

Join today to unlock all member benefits including full access to CL Answers

Join Now

Join now at www.consumerlab.com/join/