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Product Review: Resveratrol Supplements (Grape, Red Wine, and Polygonum Sources)
 

Initial Posting: 9/6/13  Last Update: 12/11/14 
Resveratrol Supplements Reviewed by ConsumerLab.com Find Out What's Really in Resveratrol Supplements. Some Contain Little Resveratrol or Do Not Meet Quality Standards.

Find Out Now If Yours Passed!

Alphabetical list of resveratrol supplement brands covered in report
21st Century Resveratrol Red Wine Extract Nature's Code (QVC) Resveratrex Shaklee Vivix
Biotivia Bioforte NutriGold Resveratrol Gold Solgar Resveratrol with Red Wine Extract
Biotivia Transmax Olympian Labs Clinical Trans Resveratrol Swanson Resveratrol
Country Life Resveratrol Plus Pure Encapsulations Resveratrol VESlsorb Trunature (Costco) Maximum Strength Resveratrol
Dr. Sinatra OmegaQ Plus with Resveratrol Puritan's Pride Resveratrol Vitacost Resveratrol Grape Seed & Red Wine Extracts
Dr. Whitaker Triveratrol Plus Puritan's Pride Resveratrol + Red Wine Extract Vitamin Shoppe Reservie Trans-Resveratrol
Finest Nutrition (Walgreen) Extra Strength Resveratrol Reserveage Organics Resveratrol Vitamin World Extra Strength Resveratrol + Red Wine Extract
Life Extension Optimized Resveratrol Resvinatrol Complete  
Make sure the resveratrol supplement you take passed our tests and is right for you!
Isn't your health worth it?
Resveratrol supplements have been popular since 2006, when studies in animals showed "life-extending" and "endurance-enhancing" effects, among other potential benefits.  Although evidence of such effects does not exist for people, resveratrol does seem to improve glucose metabolism in certain individuals and a wide-range of resveratrol (or "red wine extract") supplements are marketed, including capsules, liquids, and tablets.
 
ConsumerLab.com tested many popular resveratrol supplements on the market. One supplement was discovered to contain only 2 mg of resveratrol per capsule -- that's just 1 to 2% of the amount provided by most other products. Another supplement failed to break apart properly in disintegration testing. A third resveratrol product lacked FDA-required ingredient labeling.  The good news is that many other resveratrol supplements contained their claimed amounts of resveratrol (30 mg to 499.8 mg per serving) and passed other important tests -- including tests for contamination by lead and cadmium, which are toxic heavy metals.
 
Among the quality-approved products, ConsumerLab.com calculated the cost to obtain 100 mg of resveratrol to be as much as $3, or as little as just 6 cents -- a huge potential savings!

You must jointo get the full test results for 23 resveratrol supplements along with ConsumerLab.com recommendations and quality ratings for resveratrol. You will get results for 10 supplements selected by ConsumerLab.com and for 13 other resveratrol supplements that passed voluntary, quality certification testing, as well as information about one supplement similar to another that passed testing but which is sold under a different brand.  

In this comprehensive report, you'll discover:
    • Which resveratrol supplements failed testing and which passed
    • Direct comparisons and quality ratings of resveratrol supplements 
    • How the cis- and trans- forms of resveratrol differ and how much of each are in the tested supplements
    • Cost comparisons, showing you which of the best resveratrol supplements are lowest cost  
    • Dosage information for using resveratrol -- and what clinical studies have shown
    • Side-effects, cautions, and potential drug interactions with resveratrol 
 

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ConsumerLab.com Answers -- for Resveratrol Supplements (Grape, Red Wine, and Polygonum Sources)
Question:
Does resveratrol really activate SIRT1 - the "longevity" gene? Get the answer >>

Question:
I thought resveratrol came from red wine or grape skins - what is the "Polygonum cuspidatum" I see listed on my supplement? Get the answer >>

Question:
Are the cardiovascular benefits of resveratrol exaggerated? Get the answer >>

Question:
Are supplements which claim increased absorption or improved bioavailability telling the truth? Is it worth paying more for these? Are there concerns? Get the answer >>
Update:
(9/30/14): The distributor of the product which lacked adequate labeling information has informed ConsumerLab.com that this has been corrected on labels now entering the market. For more details, see the Update at the top of the full review.
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