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Nascent Iodine Information

Question:
I have heard that nascent iodine may be better than regular iodine or potassium iodide for thyroid support. Is this true, and what exactly is nascent iodine?

Answer:
The term "iodine" actually describes a single atom of iodide bound to either another atom of iodide or to another compound. "Nascent iodine" was once used as simply another name for sodium iodide (an iodide atom bound to sodium). The term was then used by the American mysticist, Edgar Cayce, to describe a free form of iodine (i.e., a single atom of iodide unbound to any other atom) - apparently created by adding electromagnetic or another form of energy. However, when this free form of iodide is exposed to a positively charged ion, such as sodium or potassium, as it would be in a liquid supplement, it will bind with these to form sodium iodide or potassium iodide. Therefore, if you are buying a supplement promoted as "nascent iodine", it is most likely sodium iodide or potassium iodide. There do not appear to be any published, placebo-controlled studies on "nascent iodine" for thyroid support or any other use.

Learn more about iodine and potassium iodide, including uses, dosage, and more, in the Potassium Iodide Review and the "Iodine" section of the Multivitamin and Multimineral Supplements Review.



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COMMENTS

Myrtoashe293   December 9, 2014
I have recently begun to test serum iodine on my patients with thyroid disease or fatigue, and find it lower than the standard normal range on about 20% of patients. So, I don't know where the statement comes from that it is "vanishingly rare". If anything, it may be a little more common in people who avoid iodinized salt, preferring instead sea salt or Himalayan salt.

Also, checking a serum iodine may not be a "sensitive" way of finding iodine deficient patients. I think it is very "specific" though.

CONRAD286   December 8, 2014
Seaweeds such as wakame, nori, and kombu contain substantial levels of bioavailable
iodine and may be used in various foods such as soups, curries, salads, etc.
Here is a report (one of many) from PubMed:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25006699

However, please be aware that kombu seaweed may have exceedingly high levels of iodine
when compared to wakame and nori, and should be used only in very small quantities.

CHARLES285   December 7, 2014
Iodine deficiency, once common in North America, is now vanishingly rare here. The soil of northern Indiana and Ohio is low in iodine, and when people there ate mostly food grown there, they could be iodine deficient. Today, however, food is distributed widely -- Cleveland residents eat bread made with wheat from the great plains -- and the "goiter belts" have disappeared. Some scientists suspect we are now bringing on thyroid disease by excess iodine intake. Iodine deficiency is still common in some parts of the world, such as the Andes and parts of India, where all food is obtained locally.

Robert6917   September 6, 2015
Not so. Over the last 20 years food makers have stopped putting iodine in many salts and substituted bromine for iodine in baked goods. Iodine deficiency is now emerging again.

Robert6918   September 6, 2015
I mean substituted bromine for iodine. In fact, the Mediterranean salt I've bought clearly states 'this product does not contain iodide, a necessary nutrient." I can remember when all Morton salt was iodized. Not so today, must look for it.


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This CL Answer initially posted on 12/6/2014. Last updated 8/7/2017.
ConsumerLab.com members may submit questions to CLAnswers@ConsumerLab.com. We read all questions and try to answer those of popular interest.

 
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