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Product Review: Review of Iron Supplements
 

Initial Posting: 3/29/11 Last Update: 3/30/12 
Iron supplements reviewed and tested by ConsumerLab.com 100-Fold Difference Found in Cost of Iron Supplements

Find Out Now If Yours Passed and If You're Getting the Best Value!

Alphabetical list of iron supplement brands in report

Make sure the iron supplement you take passed our test and is right for you!
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Although most of the iron supplements tested passed our review, the cost to get an equivalent dose (25 mg) of iron from these supplements ranged from just two cents to over two dollars -- a difference of over 100-fold. Differences were also found in product dosage and the forms of iron in the products (nine forms of iron were listed).
 
Iron is required to prevent and treat anemia. Iron deficiency is most common in menstruating women but also is commonly seen in children, pregnant women, and among people taking drugs that reduce stomach acid. Even mild iron deficiency may cause fatigue and impair learning, memory, and sports performance. Individual needs for supplemental iron vary and different forms may be better tolerated than others.

You must join to get the full test results for iron supplements along with ConsumerLab.com recommendations and quality ratings of iron supplements. You will get results for ten supplements selected by ConsumerLab.com and for seven others that passed voluntary certification testing, as well as information about one supplement similar to one that passed testing. 

In this comprehensive report on iron supplements, you'll discover:
    • Which iron supplements failed our review and which passed
    • Which iron supplements provided the best value 
    • Direct comparisons and quality ratings of iron supplements 
    • The pros and cons of different forms of iron (such as carbonyl iron, ferrous bisglycinate chelate, ferrous fumarate, ferrous gluconate, and ferrous sulfate, as well as heme iron polypeptide, iron protein succinylate, polysaccharide iron complex, and plant-based iron) and which may be best for you
    • Iron dosage for specific applications, including anemia and unexplained fatigue
    • How to take iron to avoid stomach upset and increase absorption
    • Concerns, cautions, and potential drug interactions with iron supplements 
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