Answer:

Yes, several well-known, national chain laboratories offer a test that measures CoQ10 levels in the blood. Although this test does not measure CoQ10 levels in heart tissue itself (which will differ from blood levels), it can reveal if you are below the normal range, and help your health care provider determine an appropriate dose for your condition, as well as monitor your response to certain drugs, like statins (which can lower blood levels of CoQ10). For more about this test, including the normal range for blood levels of CoQ10, see the CoQ10 and Ubiquinol Supplements Review >>

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5 Comments

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Brett379
January 9, 2015

Does taking natural verses synthetic CoQ10 make a difference. How to do you know which product is natural or synthetic.

ConsumerLab.com
January 15, 2015

Hi Brett - We've now answered your question here: https://www.consumerlab.com/answers/%20/natural_vs_synthetic_CoQ10/

Dave363
January 5, 2015

I have been taking statin drugs for over 15 years. The past couple of years I have noticed increased muscular pain in my legs while doing my daily 2-mile walks. Researching statin drugs, I read that they reduce CoQ10 levels in the body, including the heart muscle. I then stared a regiment of CoQ10 and have reduced the leg pains more than 85%. My cardiologist has agreed with my prognosis, and encouraged me to continue the CoQ10 along with the statins. I have been taking 100mg twice daily for the past 3 months, and am planning to reduce that to once per day to see if that will keep my QoQ10 levels where they should be.

Ed367
January 5, 2015

Which form and brand of coq10 was taken?

Janet360
January 4, 2015

That's an excellent question & I'm glad to read the answer also. It has motivated me to read about coQ10 again & ask my doctor about whether I can benefit from supplementation. Another reason to love ConsumerLab!

Robert B358
January 4, 2015

I had C H F, do to sleep apnea. On a follow up visit to my heart surgeon. He asked me what the hell have you been doing? I asked him what he meant by that, thinking that I had gotten in much worse shape. He stated that I no longer had C H F and he has never heard of anyone getting rid of it before and wanted to know what I have been doing or taking and in telling him CoQ10, he wanted to know what that was ? So I down loaded and printed all the information that I could find and took it to him and he began treating his C H F patients with CoQ10.
So all I can say is, that it dam sure worked for me.

Robert

Theresa 364
January 5, 2015

What brand do you take Robert?

Mike407
January 21, 2015

If your heart surgeon does not know what coq10 is, then you need to find a new heart surgeon! Seriously, if you did not make this story up, then your doctor is incompetent.

Roger424
January 25, 2015

Robert, I am a psychiatrist with a special interest in the nutritional/hormonal factors that make the brain work. Doctors and scientists have found many of the same factors (including CoQ-10) make BOTH the brain and the heart work better. There is SO much information on CoQ-10 that a specialist SHOULD know all about it, and be able to quote how much to use, which kinds are better absorbed, how statins work to block CoQ-10, etc, etc.
This is all to comment that Mike407 is speaking the truth!!

Carol685
April 22, 2015

I agree 100% with Mike.

John15654
October 8, 2017

Our son had an aortic valve replacement in 1999. His left ventricle was three times normal size and had very little contractile function. The cardiac surgeon doubted it could ever recover.
Thankfully, his cardiologist said 'Q10 would fix it'. It did! His left ventricle returned to normal size with normal ejection fraction, within 12 months. Repeating what Robert said - we are sure it worked for our son.

Patrick357
January 4, 2015

Would it help with my condition of nonischemic cardiomyopathy

ConsumerLab.com
January 6, 2015

Hi Patrick - One of the studies referenced the CoQ10 Review ( https://www.consumerlab.com/reviews/CoQ10-Ubiquinol-Supplements-Review/CoQ10/#bloodtest) looked at CoQ10 levels many people with cardiomyopathy, most of whom had nonischemic forms, and did suggest rationale for treatment with CoQ10.

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