CL Answers (21)

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Clinical Updates (7)

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Low-Cal Orange Juice For Kidney Stones?

Increasing citrate intake may reduce the risk of kidney stones. Find out how effective low-cal orange juice is at increasing citrate in our answer to the question: Can lemon juice, lemonade, or other juices reduce my chances of getting kidney stones?

Kidney Stones Linked to Calcium and Vitamin D Supplementation

A recent report showed that women taking a calcium and vitamin D supplement over a period of several years were 17% more likely to develop kidney stones than women who did not take the supplement. ConsumerLab.com reviewed this study. While the findings are correct, there seems to be no reason to give up vitamin D supplements and a small concern with calcium supplementation. Get the details in the update to the Calcium Supplements Review >>. The new information is also found in an update in the Vitamin D Supplements Review >>.

Too Much Calcium for Some?

A new study found that supplementing with even moderate amounts of calcium may cause abnormally high calcium levels in the urine (a risk factor for kidney stones) of some postmenopausal women, even when total calcium intake doesn't exceed the recommended daily allowance. Get the details in the update to the Calcium Supplements Review (Including Vitamin D, Vitamin K, and Magnesium) >>   

Calcium Supplements Increase Kidney Stone Growth

Calcium supplementation is known to increase the risk of kidney stones in postmenopausal women. A new study shows that taking calcium nearly doubles the monthly growth of such stones in women prone to getting them. The study also assessed the effects of vitamin D supplementation. Details are found in the Calcium Supplements Review >>

Kidney Stones Due to Supplement?

An unusual type of kidney stone has been reported in several people who regularly consumed large amounts of a vitamin and amino acid supplement containing a particular form of choline and vitamin C. For details, see the Concerns and Cautions section of the Choline Supplements Review.

High-Dose Vitamin D Risk

A new study suggests that very high-dose vitamin D may increase the risk of kidney stones. For details, see the What It Does section of the Vitamin D Supplements Review. (Also see our Top Picks among vitamin D supplements.)

Vitamin C and Kidney Damage

High doses of vitamin C can cause kidney stones and damage kidneys. People with certain diets or medical conditions may be more prone to these problems. Get the details, including those of a recent case, in the Concerns and Cautions section of the Vitamin C Supplements Review.